Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

Thomas Bavington

remixedwriter:

tampon007:

yamashta:

dash-of-dark:

JUST FUCKING LISTEN. 

THIS IS HALLOWEEN BUT NOT LIKE YOU KNOW IT

reblog so others can hear it!

Vitamin String Quartet

LISTENTOTHISNOW

reblogged in like two seconds.

(via shandamn)

radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 
radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.
More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 

radpghfem:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

^ One of many great things to direct someone to anytime they start going off about how “real beauty” was appreciated back in the good ol’ glamorous retro days.

More info on that weird head vice created by Max Factor: It was called the “beauty micrometer,” originally created for the application of makeup on film actors, and didn’t really correct the application of makeup so much as pinpoint the exact places where makeup needed to be applied to ensure the actor’s face measured up to symmetrical, perfectly-proportioned beauty standards as much as possible. 

(via jerk-o-lantern)


The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

(via jerk-o-lantern)

discovondoom:

Same.

mrsdallogay:

mrsdallogay:

my life got about a thousand times better once i stopped censoring myself

and by censoring i don’t mean i suddenly embraced indiscriminate swearing; i mean i stopped trying to sugarcoat my past or my feelings; i stopped lying by omission; i stopped having guilty pleasures; i began unabashedly enjoying whatever i liked; i became very honest; i cut out of my life poisonous people and negative ideals, and i am so, so much happier for it

(via bransdancepants)

magicul:

do you ever get really motivated to do something and you get really excited about it and then when you get home you’re just like nah

(via floralgreentea)


"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

(via allmydreamslostatsea)

whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!
whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"
-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)
This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!

whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"

-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)

This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!

(via jerk-o-lantern)

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.
Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.
General tips on how to keep them organized:
Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.
Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.
Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)


For reference

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.

  1. Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
  2. Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
  3. Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
  4. Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
  5. Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
  6. Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
  7. When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

General tips on how to keep them organized:

  • Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
  • Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
  • Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)

For reference

(via second-star-ontheright)

down2chill:

the other side too tho 3 blown by shawndaddy

(via yourelivinginafantasy)